A Nugget

The nugget has arrived in Lima! The morning after we got back to Lima, we went straight to see Abigail (ZZ's 18 month-old granddaughter and Lauren's niece who is visiting Peru for the first time!) We've had so much fun seeing the sites of Lima with her and watching her enjoy the Peruvian cuisine. We know she's a true Peruvian because she loves to munch on raw red onions. At the moment she's probably the cutest toddler in Peru. We can't wait to see her in her new alpaca poncho!

We also visited the house that Julie (ZZ's daughter) spent the majority of her childhood in in Lima before she left to come to the United States. The house looks different than it did when Julie lived there, but being there brought back emotional memories of her time there. For Lauren, it was powerful to see where her sister spent much of her life before living with the Henschels in Miami. It was meaningful for both of us to see where Julie spent much of her childhood and to hear her describe her childhood in Lima. 

 ZZ, Abigail and Julie in front of Julie's childhood home 

ZZ, Abigail and Julie in front of Julie's childhood home 

A Futbol

 Supporting Team Cristal

Supporting Team Cristal

That afternoon, we got to experience a Peruvian club futbol (soccer) match firsthand. Edgar, Nils and Julie brought us to one of the stadiums in Lima where we were corralled into the ticket line by riot police on horseback, had to make up fake passport numbers, and were seated by our hosts in the family section surrounded by fences and barbed wire. Needless to say, the fans in Lima take soccer very seriously. So seriously that alcohol sales are banned in the stadium. Don't worry, we binged on sugary snacks instead and no one got hurt. Even though the game was scoreless, we thoroughly enjoyed watching the game and especially the fan section that began singing chants before the players got on the field and didn't stop once throughout the game, even when the riot police tried to break up a mosh pit. 

A Finca

 Family at the finca

Family at the finca

The next day, we were told we were visiting ZZ's cousin's finca (very loose translation: farm) for lunch. It turns out that no one describing it had ever actually been there. The house was in fact part of a suburban housing development, but they did have a lovely garden patch in the backyard where they grow a few grapevines and herbs. We pushed through a food coma to film interviews with ZZ and Tio Wilson on the rooftop. It was incredibly meaningful for us to sit down and debrief the road trip with the two of them. Both ZZ and Wilson spoke about the significance of having the opportunity to take this trip with their family members and return to the places that have meaning to them. We finished off the night passing around beers in the vineyard/garden, talking about the importance of family and the forces of migration and immigration in Peru. 

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